Two Kingdoms (Palm Sunday)

Today we celebrate Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, when he came from the East and was welcomed as King by the people.  It was Jesus’ triumphal entry.  Another man entered the city that day and had his own triumphal entry.  He was Pontius Pilate, and he represented a completely different kingdom. He came from the West.  Let’s hear about these two men and their two kingdoms.

A:      He’s coming from the West.

B:       He’s coming from the East

A:      In a mighty procession of gleaming armour and burnished leather

B:       There’s no armour, no weapons, just a man in flowing robes

A:      Warriors on horseback lead the way

B:       He’s riding a donkey

A:      The crowd is beaten and pushed out of the way 

B:       The crowd is welcomed

A:      The people are fearful – they cower and flee

B:       The people are joyous – they lay their cloaks on the ground, and cut branches and lie them before him

A:      The people are silent

B:       The people cry out – Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord

A:      The message is clear.

B:       The message is clear.

A:      The Emperor’s representative has come

B:       The King has come

A:      He’s come to take charge

B:       He’s come to set people free

A:      He’s come for those who are powerful and important.

B:       He’s come for everybody

A:      No wonder people are afraid

B:       No wonder people love him.

A:      It’s a kingdom of power and prestige, grandeur, political and military authority

B:       It’s a kingdom of compassion, humility, love, suffering; but most of all, peace.

A:      You can’t live in both.

B:       Which one will you choose?

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